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And, they say, we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg.INTERNET PRIVACY is a murky, complicated issue full of conflicting interests, misinformation, innuendo and technology snafus.

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Earlier this year, a hacker posted tens of thousands of credit card numbers stolen from CD Universe on a Web site; he offered to share more for

Earlier this year, a hacker posted tens of thousands of credit card numbers stolen from CD Universe on a Web site; he offered to share more for $1 apiece.

Later, an MSNBC investigation revealed dozens of Internet Relay Chat rooms where stolen personal profiles - names, addresses, phone numbers, and credit card numbers - are bought, sold and traded out in the open.

Somebody’s out there ruining my reputation.” Super cyber-sleuth Richard Smith, now chief technical officer at the non-profit Privacy Foundation, had someone run up credit card bills under his name recently, too.

“They used my FAX number as the home phone number in the application and I started getting all these calls, ‘When are you going to pay your bills? Most of the horror stories from the online privacy realm stem from criminals.

“I called her up and said ‘You don’t know who I am but I’m driving the car you sold.’ She talked to me, but at the end said, ‘How did you find me’? Increasingly, Internet users find themselves asking someone “How did you find me?

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Earlier this year, a hacker posted tens of thousands of credit card numbers stolen from CD Universe on a Web site; he offered to share more for $1 apiece.Later, an MSNBC investigation revealed dozens of Internet Relay Chat rooms where stolen personal profiles - names, addresses, phone numbers, and credit card numbers - are bought, sold and traded out in the open.Somebody’s out there ruining my reputation.” Super cyber-sleuth Richard Smith, now chief technical officer at the non-profit Privacy Foundation, had someone run up credit card bills under his name recently, too.“They used my FAX number as the home phone number in the application and I started getting all these calls, ‘When are you going to pay your bills? Most of the horror stories from the online privacy realm stem from criminals.“I called her up and said ‘You don’t know who I am but I’m driving the car you sold.’ She talked to me, but at the end said, ‘How did you find me’? Increasingly, Internet users find themselves asking someone “How did you find me?

apiece.Later, an MSNBC investigation revealed dozens of Internet Relay Chat rooms where stolen personal profiles - names, addresses, phone numbers, and credit card numbers - are bought, sold and traded out in the open.Somebody’s out there ruining my reputation.” Super cyber-sleuth Richard Smith, now chief technical officer at the non-profit Privacy Foundation, had someone run up credit card bills under his name recently, too.“They used my FAX number as the home phone number in the application and I started getting all these calls, ‘When are you going to pay your bills? Most of the horror stories from the online privacy realm stem from criminals.“I called her up and said ‘You don’t know who I am but I’m driving the car you sold.’ She talked to me, but at the end said, ‘How did you find me’? Increasingly, Internet users find themselves asking someone “How did you find me?

” The experience can change the privacy topic from a government policy issue into a highly personal problem. If you are a victim of identity theft, you experience a change of world view, you realize how little control you have over your world.” While most of the drama of Net privacy comes from crime, almost all the public debate has centered around Web companies collecting data for marketing purposes.On the face of it, e-commerce companies and privacy advocates are locked in stalemate.Web sites want to know all they can about you; consumers generally want to share as little as possible.But privacy concerns don’t always arise from criminal activity.Privacy advocate and well-known spam fighter Ian Oxman was surprised earlier this year how easily he was able to track down the former owner of a used car he had just purchased.Every question they’ve asked and every statement they’ve made is now stored on a hard drive somewhere. Jackson was a victim of identity theft earlier this year.